An exploration of our Earth's ever-captivating fauna through musings on the bizarre side of Zoology, Cryptozoology, Paleontology, and Paleoanthropology

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Happy Sea Serpent Day!

Various "sea serpent" artwork and eyewitness sketches compiled into a holiday banner!
Please click to enlarge and see it in all its cryptozoological beauty!


I almost forgot about it, but today (August 7th) is apparently "Sea Serpent Day!" This holiday seems as bizarre as the reported creatures themselves, as it is difficult to discover why today was chosen for it. In this article, Loren Coleman has suggested that it was due to two renowned 'sea serpent' sightings which occurred a day before this date. On August 6, 1817, the commonly witnessed "Gloucester sea serpent" was allegedly observed. Interestingly, the alleged animals had been reported daily for a period of time and even very skeptical 'sea serpent' report researchers have stated that something truly unique was likely going on there. The famed sighting of an alleged 60-foot long and maned 'sea serpent' by the crew of the naval ship HMS Daedalus also occurred on the date of August 6, 1848. 'Sea serpent' sightings are one of the most interesting areas of research I have conducted (if not the most interesting), and I hope that you have enjoyed my articles on the subject so far, as more are coming very soon. If you wish to conduct your own research into 'sea serpent' sightings, then you should definitely purchase In The Wake of The Sea-Serpents by Bernard Heuvelmans through Amazon. I recently received it (mine is a used copy yet is still in perfect condition), and there truly is nothing like it for research use. So I hope you had a wonderful "Sea Serpent Day" and continue to come back here for more articles regarding the intriguing and often reliable reports of what may be a truly unknown, large marine species.

10 comments:

  1. You should come to the cfz Weird weekend in England Jay. P.S. Keep up the great work you are doing, us old fogies will feel better having young enthusiastic intelligent people like you to keep it all going, Regards Michael.

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    1. I wish I could make it, but sadly I'm across the pond and won't be able to. Thank you very much Michael.

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  2. Could some sea serpent sightings be of large aquatic humonoids?

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    1. I highly doubt it. None of the reports I've read seem to suggest that. And there already is a good explanation for such sightings: http://biologicalmarginalia.tumblr.com/post/52498633722/contrary-to-the-suggestion-that-merfolk-myths-were

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  3. I'm just putting that out there; In don't necessarily support the idea.

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  4. What I meant to say was "I don't support the idea that sightings of longnecked, horseheaded, manyfinned, or manyhumped sea serpents are likely to be of unknown aquatic humonoids; I do, however, consider it possible that some cases involving aquatic cryptids that are said to be human in appearance (such as the famous amboine mermaid, said to have been held in a tank) could be genuine accounts of aquatic humonoids.

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    1. Understood, however, there are other more likely explanations such as marine mammals which can look rather humanoid at times (http://25.media.tumblr.com/23e8b71569a3fe1cafe9e3d52b68ebe7/tumblr_mq30iskujP1snbxleo1_1280.jpg).

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  5. If you want to read more about cryptozoological (as opposed to mythical) merfolk, here are some links.

    Frontiers of Zoology.blogspot "Marine Monkeys and Merfolk"

    ShukerNature.blogspot "Mermaid Body Found? In Search of Folk With Fins"

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    1. Interesting hypotheses, but it seems that fish-tailed primates are biologically I possible: http://25.media.tumblr.com/23e8b71569a3fe1cafe9e3d52b68ebe7/tumblr_mq30iskujP1snbxleo1_1280.jpg

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